ON STARTING, OVERCOMING REJECTION, & BELIEVING IN THE POWER OF YET.

For makers, artist and small business owners, overcoming rejection and the fear of starting your business is a struggle faced daily. Find out how Jasmin got started with her jewelry business, overcame rejection and believed in the power of what was yet to be.
“The risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.” -Anais Nin

Fear.

While it is necessary for basic survival, when it comes to creative output, it can be paralyzing. That is, if one lets it. I have struggled with fear in the form of perfectionism nearly all of my adult life, and I credit this hangup to holding me back from pursuing a career in the fashion industry until very recently. Something about approaching mid life has put a fire under my belt however, and I have discovered I long to be in creative motion more than I fear imperfection.

Get over yourself and start.

I am Jasmin Rich, I am a wife, mother of three, former social studies teacher, and now the solopreneur and designer behind Rogue Swan, a boutique jewelry line just launched as of August 2016. Rogue Swan has taken eight months to plan and develop, but represents years of stirring within me to finally just get over myself and start.

People have told me my entire life that I had talent, charisma, that there was something in me. And although I had a burning desire to find what would be there if I designed a line of something, I avoided doing so and took safe paths every time I made major life choices.

For makers, artist and small business owners, overcoming rejection and the fear of starting your business is a struggle faced daily. Find out how Jasmin got started with her jewelry business, overcame rejection and believed in the power of what was yet to be.

Rogue Swan is all about the beauty of a woman who owns her own style. It is feminine, whimsical, yet earthy and free spirited; it makes no apologies. I designed it to be glamorously rugged because that is what is in my soul- a desire to experience beauty while being true to self. When I am designing I imagine myself painting in a crazed way, like Ed Harris did portraying Jackson Pollock, chasing the idea as fast as I can before it leaves me. 

You get as much as your willingness to ask. If you are afraid to ask for what you want, business will be a frustration.

The launch really came together all at the last minute, between shopping trips, photo shoots, and last minute hurried making.

Going back to the topic of fear, one of the scariest things for me was making my need for models known to a few women whose style and look I felt would represent my brand in a lovely way. I wasn’t able to afford paid models yet, so I asked some ladies in my neighborhood who are really talented with fashion and have really giving hearts to boot.

To my surprise that fear was forgotten when these women not only so graciously accepted the task, but also went above and beyond with letting me rummage through their closets and getting their hair and makeup done- all because, as it turned out, they wanted me to succeed.

It is ok to work with what you have, and start from where you are. Let your God given gift of vision as an artist be “enough” to assert yourself as an expert in your field.

Another hangup I have is feeling like I am not enough to be a designer. There are constant voices of self criticism that plague me, and I have to choose whether or not to allow myself to grow by doing something uncomfortable, or again, sit around wondering.

The voices say: I am not rich enough, connected enough, thin enough, pretty enough, graceful enough, petite enough, and so on. And these voices somewhat speak the truth: I am from a family who was somewhat isolated because my parents spent much of my formative years just surviving rather than being social or trying new things.

They were of the mindset that you get a government job and work for your pension- so my entrepreneurial self is basically alien in my family. I am still trying to get the pre-baby body back, so getting dressed for events makes me nervous. I am tall, loud, and I swear- A. Lot. I am clumsy and many times I say the exact single most wrong thing.

Self-consciousness is a form of self absorption. Holding back does not help you nor others. When we put ourselves out there to achieve, our success gives us the reach and resources to bless others.

But I have to figure: if God put these notions and stirrings in my head, and I make myself small and hide out, I am neglecting to honor the gift he gave me.

Self-consciousness can take the form of vanity, albeit from a negative perspective. If I hold back for these reasons, I am essentially choosing vanity over growth. Time pressure and necessity forces me to decide whether I will spend my days sitting around wondering if I can do something or just doing it.

Get over rejection.

It is an inevitable part of finding your niche.

I am typical of an artist in that I am sensitive and passionate. Recently, I have had to release the expectation that my jewelry will always be well received. I have given up the illusion that this will be easy, that there will be boutiques lining up and sending emails to carry the line.

I have had to come to terms that rejection is inevitable, and a (necessary) part of the journey. I am strong enough to ask, and to ask again and again.

And when I hit a dead end, I numb myself to the rejection, I don’t dwell there or second guess my talent, but rather remind myself that my jewelry is not for anyone and everyone, that there is an ideal audience out there, that the internet is a big place, and for every ten emails ignored is an email response that takes the business to the next step.

Believe in the power of “yet.”

It is easy to get lost in a case of the imposter syndrome- meaning we feel afraid to offer a talent for money because of what others will wonder, “Who does she think she is?”

It is hard to stomach the part of being in the emerging phase, asserting one’s self, acting the part, all with a small following and little traction. That is where resilience and strength is built though, I am quite convinced.

And I believe in the power of “yet.” I believe in my talent even if I have not entirely “arrived” yet. Because I have noticed that once business owners are successful, people will knock down their doors to get a piece of them, but it didn’t happen in the beginning.

Be self assured in your value as a designer. Remember that not everyone can do what you can do, in the way that you do it.

As far as selling goes, it is a part of owning any business.

"As far as selling goes, it is a part of owning any business."

Many of us have the fear of being annoying by putting our service or product out there. But that is the beauty of the internet, if someone is annoyed, they can simply scroll on, I obligate no one by asking for a sale. It's an ask, not a tell.

I was tired of giving my talents away for free, (usually in the form of advice and help putting a look together), yet I don’t think most people ever expected me to- it was a side effect of my own self-devaluation.

People are perfectly comfortable handing their money to corporate big box stores.

Most people would not attempt to haggle with their accountant or attorney because those professionals have respected expertise. My expertise happens to be creating jewelry that expresses something feminine yet wildhearted.

I can style items in a romantic way that captures the imagination in a photo shoot. I am able to compose with color schemes and patterns, and communicate with my customer visually.

There comes a time when an artist needs to value her expertise, (without the approval of or permission from others) and honor her gift, because the reality is, charging for one’s work is the only way to sustain a continual outpouring of creativity.

"There comes a time when an artist needs to value her expertise because the reality is, charging for one’s work is the only way to sustain a continual outpouring of creativity."

So, to simplify, these are my few take aways:

  1. “The risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.” -Anais Nin

  2. Let your God given gift of vision as an artist be “enough” to assert yourself as an expert in your field.

  3. You get as much as your willingness to ask. If you are afraid to ask for what you want, business will be a frustration.

  4. Self consciousness is a form of self absorption. Holding back does not help you nor others. When we put ourselves out there to achieve, our success gives us the reach and resources to bless others.

  5. Believe in the power of “yet.” Remind yourself you are committed and it will take time to establish a brand.

  6. Get over rejection. It is an inevitable part of finding your niche.

  7. Be self assured in your value as a designer. Remember that not everyone can do what you can do, in the way that you do it.

For makers, artist and small business owners, overcoming rejection and the fear of starting your business is a struggle faced daily. Find out how Jasmin got started with her jewelry business, overcame rejection and believed in the power of what was yet to be.

Jasmin Rich is the silly southern hippie behind Rogue Swan, a handmade boutique jewelry line designed for bohemian chicks with mad style. She spends her days on a quest for beauty in the unexpected and het nights dreaming of Coachella, wild horses, and rocky mountain highs.

You can learn more about Jasmin and shop Rogue Swan beautiful line of bohemian jewelry on her site www.therogueswan.com & follow along on Instagram & Facebook.